Monday, May 17, 2010

Mangalitsa Lardo is ready

Here is the gigantic piece of Lardo that's been sitting in my chamber for 3 months. This stuff is just silly. Look at that lovely rose colored hue running right through the middle of it. I was concerned that it wouldn't be cured, I only left it to cure for 3 weeks. I also dried it as I would any other salumi, bearing in mind I don't have the unique marble coffin used in Tuscany for just this application. But, I am relieved to announce it is just fine. In fact, more than fine. It's terrific. I think God put these piggies on earth specifically to cure, I can't imagine they serve a better purpose than this. As I wrote prior regarding the coppa and how it melts in your mouth, the Lardo is even more unctuous, if that's possible. I sliced some paper thin to put on bruschetta. I toasted the bread and while it was still warm added the lardo. It was drizzled with top notch olive oil and cracked pepper. By the time I got to it, the lardo had begun to melt into the bread..............sick. There is one small caveat with this stuff. But, this goes for all salumi. I sliced a little with a knife that was a bit thicker than the with the machine and I didn't care for the mouth feel, it was a bit challenging. Again, this is true of all salumi. Sliced thinly on bruschetta, I made a whole lot disappear. Another small bit of advice when playing with Lardo. Prior to slicing, remove it from the chamber and either into the refrigerator for a couple hours or into the freezer for a couple minutes. This will make it much easier to slice. Otherwise, it will get really soft and be a pain in the neck to slice correctly. As you can see by the picture, it was starting to sweat a little. Doesn't take long, maybe 5 minutes. Mangalitsa guanciale is up next.

37 comments:

  1. Nice Scott, I'll take 2 orders to go please! Things like this are why we nice slicers at home!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bellisima!

    And, oh yeah, howz bout a little taste for the comment makers?

    ReplyDelete
  3. That turned out really nice. I found out (by accident) when rendering diced pieces of it to make a lardo vinaigrette, that the completely rendered pieces might be better than bacon...

    Can't wait to see how the guanciale turns out.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It looks fabulous. Lrdo is nowhere to be found in MN - I even thought about making it. Bravo!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks, all. Claudia, no reason not to do it yourself. Even if you don't have any cure #2(which is easy enough to buy online), just salt will work fine.

    ReplyDelete
  6. that is one HUGE piece of lardo! it looks absolutely fantastic. I got to try some Mang. lardo a few weeks ago thanks to Heath from Wooly Pigs, and it was delightful I have to say.

    I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience, and a far superior one I have to add.

    A couple of weeks ago I got to try a roast coppa - not cured, just the muscle bundle roasted. It got Sous Vide for 16 hours, then finished in a wood burning oven. It was frankly the best pork I had ever had - the coppa was from a Mangalista too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Can't wait to serve this to my sister-in law who is coming to town.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Totally agree with you on the thick v. thin slices of lardo. BUT... I recently fried up some pieces like bacon to use as a garnish for another dish, and holy crap! It was just like bacon. Only better. I highly recommend it...

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hank, that is a whole different application than raw sliced. I can only imagine how fantastic that is. I'm not sure I can bring myself to actually fry it off. I WAS considering a variation of carbonara using fried Lardo, but, that may be gilding the lilly just a bit.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Scott, this looks fabulous. I can just imagine its melt-in-your-mouth texture. Gorgeous stuff.

    Claudia- I'm also in MN, and have some #2 curing salt. Now we just need to find the right pig. :)

    a presto,
    Jennifer

    ReplyDelete
  11. we've made some lardo and bacon from the mangolitza pig here at the culinary institute of america too. your description is absolutely accurate...silly! for my money, there isn't a better pig out there. used some of the fat in my sausage making as well-whoa. i bet your coppa was out of control too

    -Kevin McCann
    M.I.T. meat rooom
    Culinary Institute of America

    ReplyDelete
  12. I had lardo di colinata when i was in tuscany with prepared it with wood grilled peaches and also cooked the crostini on the wood fire, then simply melted the lardo ontop still the best crostini i,ve ever made. Your lardo looks perfect!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Kevin: I've seen some of your guys' work over at Chef Schneller's blog. I only live about 45 minutes away, I'd love to come up and have a look at the operation. The coppa is ridiculous........no other word.

    Jason: Thanks! I've been harrassing some of the Larderie in Colonnata regarding the conche for preparing it their way. I've yet to be able to buy one.

    Jennifer: Just go to a local butcher and ask for a nice piece of fatback. I was stupid and decided my first Lardo would be Mangalitsa, I should have practiced on something a whole lot less expensive.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I got to try some Mang. lardo a few weeks ago thanks to Heath from Wooly Pigs, and it was delightful I have to say.I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience and a far superior one.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Scott, a few issues ago Art of Eating had an article on lardo, and they mentioned a conceria that sells their concia. Email me to remind me to get the name for you.

    ReplyDelete
  16. OMG the lardo looks yummy,Its a fabulous recipe ,i tried to making it,thanx for posting.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Well, I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience and a far superior one. thanx.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I can just imagine its melt-in-your-mouth texture. Gorgeous stuff. keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience and a far superior one. Thanx for the post.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Well, This will make it much easier to slice.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I was in tuscany with prepared it with wood grilled peaches and also cooked the crostini on the wood fire, then simply melted the lardo ontop still the best crostini i,ve ever made. Your lardo looks perfect! Keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Well, I recently fried up some pieces like bacon to use as a garnish for another dish, and holy crap! It was just like bacon. Only better.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hmmm Thanks! I've been harrassing some of the Larderie in Colonnata regarding the conche for preparing it their way. I've yet to be able to buy one. thanx again for sharing the recipe with us.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Love your recipe and I'm looking forward to know more about your blog recipes.Thank for sharing your dish.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Well, I'd love to come up and have a look at the operation. The coppa is ridiculous. no other word, thanx for the post.

    ReplyDelete
  26. It looks absolutely yummy. I am hoping to have more recipe from you. It;s kinda unique to me, Nice blog. Keep on posting.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Well, I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience, and a far superior one I have to add.

    ReplyDelete
  28. absolutely ill agree with you, so unique thanks for sharing nice post..

    ReplyDelete
  29. Well, I'm looking forward to know more about your blog recipes. Thank for sharing your dish with us, keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Amazing, you get a completely different experience and a far superior one. Thanx for the wonderful share.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Wow, i was in tuscany with prepared it with wood grilled peaches and also cooked the crostini on the wood fire, then simply melted the lardo ontop still the best crostini i,ve ever made. Your lardo looks perfect!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I have to say.I totally agree with slicing super thinly - you get a completely different experience and a far superior one.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Wow, Its a fabulous recipe ,i tried to making it, thanx for posting, keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I can just imagine its melt-in-your-mouth texture. Gorgeous stuff, thanx for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hmmm Thanks! I've been harrassing some of the Larderie in Colonnata regarding the conche for preparing it their way. I've yet to be able to buy one. thanx again for sharing the recipe with us.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Nice post and your blog is having some very great information.

    ReplyDelete